Bible

This is a year-long course, but each semester is self-contained and can be taken independently. (For dual credit, students must take both semesters) In the Fall, the course will explore the gospels and the life of Jesus primarily focused upon the Gospel of Luke and John. In the Spring, students will cover the remaining New Testament focusing upon the authorship, dating, and context of remainder of the books.

The course focuses on students developing an understanding of the concept of life-calling and the discovery of one’s God-given design as a basis for this calling. Students are led to understand how work and individual leadership is best understood from this life-calling perspective. Students will evaluate their foundational values, unique design, and personal mission as well as examine each component in an in-depth paper and integrate this into a life and leadership plan. Ethos offers dual credit through Ohio Christian University for the completion of this course.

This survey course surveys all of the Old Testament. The course gives students in depth analysis of the cultural and historical backgrounds to the writings of Israel. Within this course, students will explore the Torah and its implications with Israel as well as discuss the Prophets and Writings sections of the Hebrew Scriptures. Students will wrestle with deep questions of faith and grow in knowledge and understanding of the Scriptures Jesus himself grew up reading.

English

The AP English Language and Composition course examines a variety of texts, including speeches, essays, plays, and works of literature; however, nonfiction text is the main vehicle to study language and rhetoric. It provides an opportunity for advanced high school students to pursue and receive credit for college-level course work completed at the high school level. Accordingly, the rigors of the course are intended to be commensurate with introductory college-level rhetoric and composition courses. Students are trained to be excellent critical thinkers, readers, analysts of language, effective writers, and creative, cogent producers of argument.  Students focus on the writing skills needed to be successful in the course, on the AP Language test in May, and in their later college work. Students write effectively for a range of audiences and a variety of purposes, demonstrate mastery of the conventions of standard written language, and use the steps of the writing process as needed.

The course is the advanced study of composition and literature for those students with the ability and interest in an accelerated English program. Various types of literature are studied with an emphasis on short stories, poetry, drama, and the novel. Much in-depth study and research are expected, with the student’s growth in analysis and interpretation of the literature of utmost importance. The College Board AP exam is required of students in May of the year, with emphasis on analytical critique of literature and composition skills.

Creative Writing will include readings from a variety of poetry and prose from different literary movements and chronological periods. We will study the historical and rhetorical contexts of creative fiction, poetry and non-fiction texts, and we will deconstruct them to understand figurative composition techniques. The focus will be on the application and manipulation of creative structures, and the use of authorial license to develop voice and style. Students in both classes will engage in the process of creative workshop, moving from pre-writing, drafting and peer editing to publishing and revision.

In this course, students will concentrate on the writing of short-form fiction in individual short stories and poetry.

Areas of concentration are reading, writing, language, and vocabulary. In the fall, focus is on building language skills as well as reading short stories. In addition, students read a series of short stories that focus on diverse cultures from around the world. Additionally, students write narrative essays; engage in literary analysis; write reading responses, and cite evidence to support opinions. Students also focus on the elements of short stories, figurative language, and reading comprehension. Students read novels each month. Teachers use various diagnostic tests to measure students’ growth in comprehension and to differentiate learning for each student. The second semester includes argumentative writing and literature circles. All writing pieces use MLA format. All of the aforementioned aspects will be implemented in conjunction with reading and language skills, such as grammar, punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, and pronoun case. Lastly, students are expected to practice English reading, writing, vocabulary, and writing skills.

This college-prep class will cover advanced grammar and composition and is designed to prepare students for writing expectations at GAC and beyond. Focused units will move from correct grammar usage to sentence structure to essay composition. Students will focus on the study of literature and writing in response to that literature. Elements of fiction are taught using short stories, plays, poetry, and novels. Vocabulary is taught in context and through a study of Tier 2 words as defined by the College Board. Students develop and practice basic speech skills by presenting various projects and essays. An introduction to Shakespeare includes a study of Romeo and Juliet. Multicultural studies are woven into the curriculum throughout the year, focusing on authors of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds.

The curriculum for English 10 includes the study of English grammar, composition, literature, and vocabulary. Students take weekly vocabulary tests throughout the year. Additionally, students write at least two research essays during the first semester. The topics for these essays come from literature studied in class. In the second semester, students write a persuasive research paper. With each writing assignment, students study grammar and usage rules, punctuation, and sentence structure. Literature studies include short stories, novels, nonfiction, essays, and drama. Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar is an important component of the drama unit.

This 11th grade course is a study of grammar, composition, and American literature. The major focus is a detailed survey of significant American authors. All major movements and authors are studied with an emphasis on understanding and interpretation. Literature selections to be studied include The Great Gatsby, Death of a Salesman, and a classic choice for research analysis. In addition to these classic selections, students also choose a contemporary, critically-acclaimed book to read and analyze. Grammar concepts are studied throughout the year. Students have many opportunities to improve composition skills through units studied, frequent theme writing, and essay testing. A research paper is required. College Preparatory vocabulary is emphasized.

As the final preparatory English class before college, English 12 focuses on reading critically, developing an extensive vocabulary, and honing writing skills according to college expectations. Each six-week period will study a time period in British Literature, with reading quizzes, online discussion posts and peer responses, weekly vocabulary practice with three quizzes each semester, an essay assignment, and a unit test. Of the six total essays during the year, five will be research-based using MLA format for citing sources. Students choosing to take the class for college credit will take a final exam both semesters.

Using short stories/selections from different genres, students will gain deeper practice in understanding what they read. They will learn explicitly taught strategies and multidisciplinary practices to support understanding, application, and enjoyment in reading. Students will think critically while reading, discussing, and evaluating short stories with the intention to increase interest, passion, and future pursuit of reading for enjoyment.

This course is also available for Summer 2021!

Fine Arts

The AP Art History course explores such topics as the nature of art, its uses, its meanings, art making, and responses to art. Through investigation of diverse artistic traditions of cultures from prehistory to the present, the course fosters in-depth and holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students learn and apply skills of visual, contextual, and comparative analysis to engage with a variety of art forms. The course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory university art history course. Students who have been successful in humanities courses, such as history and literature, or in studio art courses, are especially encouraged to enroll since those experiences will likely support and enrich the context of the art history course.

The AP Music Theory course roughly parallels the content of a college freshman year theory course although some of the topics included are usually covered quite late in the undergraduate course of study. The material is covered very rapidly so that it can all be fitted into the course.  Significant critical/analytical/ creative thinking skills are fostered in most parts of the course, and especially in considerations of texture, harmonic progression, formal structuring, and style.  AP Examination questions emphasize the synthesis of musical knowledge into usable musical understanding; the final question on the test asks students to show understanding of harmonic progression in the common practice style.

In addition, the instructor maintains a policy of teaching an advanced theory course that is of significant relevance to students who will not go on to major in music.  It is the goal of this course to gain knowledge of musical elements (melody, harmony, form, rhythm, meter, texture, timbre, etc.) and use this knowledge through various listening, singing, writing, analytical, and creative activities to develop various speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills associated with the language of music.

Students will become well rounded in the fundamentals of digital photography. Areas of instruction include using a camera in manual mode, elements of composition, the exposure triangle, editing in Adobe Photoshop, and developing a creative eye. Students will have the opportunity to study influential photographers and examine various forms of photography. This online course can be taken during the summer or during the school year. This course may be taken concurrently with high schoolers seeking high school credit.

General

This one semester course emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal health and wellness. Students will explore the physical, mental/emotional, social, and spiritual aspects of health, and how all aspects are connected in learning to appreciate and care for their bodies and minds. Topics will include nutrition, weight management, stress management, peer relationships, alcohol and tobacco, drugs, and communicable and non- communicable diseases. In addition, students will participate in Georgia’s required Alcohol and Drug Awareness Program (ADAP), which is required for all 16-year-old students who apply for a driver’s license.

This course is also available for Summer 2021!

Ethos Performance is an online option for students to access all of the content and instruction from Performance Training through a digital platform called Teambuilder. Ethos Performance Training is based on the scientific principles of kinesiology, exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports medicine, and athletic training. Our mission remains to engage, educate, and empower the student-athlete to develop skills that will translate to improved sport performance and a lifetime of wellness.

This course provides an entry-level introduction to computer programming to introduce the basic fundamentals of programming, logical thinking skills, and computer science in general. It is very well suited for beginner programmers, or those who have had some introduction to programming using Scratch or similar block programming, especially if it has been several years since learning those skills. The class employs a hands-on approach that enables students to program write progressively more complex programs, while the web-based format provides immediate feedback for the students as they write code in the online editor. At the completion of this course, the students will have a general grasp of the concepts of computer science and the Python programming language, and more importantly, an understanding of how to organize and structure Python programs to achieve a task.

This second course in Python further develops students’ programming skills to reinforce and strengthen the fundamentals of programming, logical thinking skills, and problem-solving. This course is suitable for students who have previously completed Python I, or who already have some experience programming other languages. The class employs a hands-on approach that enables students to program write progressively more complex programs, beginning with variables, datatypes, and operators. Students will continue with learning how to program conditionals, loops, and functions; and progress to strings and data structures. At the completion of this course, the students will have obtained a working knowledge of the Python programming language, and the skills to develop programs in other languages as well.

History

Students in 7th grade study the ideas, issues, and events in America’s history from the Meso-American civilizations through Reconstruction. Topics of study focus on people and events crucial in the development of American society, culture, political system, and economy. Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical skills including chronological and spatial thinking; distinguishing evidence and point of view in primary sources; and interpretation of historical events.

Students in 8th grade social studies study the ideas, issues, and events in America’s history from the reshaping of our nation in the late 1800s to present day. Students develop an understanding of current global issues and the relationship to historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Emphasis will be placed on skills including chronological and spatial thinking; demonstration of skills related to historical research and point of view; and interpretation of events.

Students are made aware of the world, its people, its culture, and its rich history. The six pillars of a civilization (Religion, Government and Economy, Social Systems, Arts and Entertainment, Language, and Science and Technology) are used as the framework for each unit of study. The units of study for this course include:  Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India, Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages.  In addition, students will practice and improve their research, reading, writing, presentation, and map skills.

This course is defined as a study of the development of European civilization from the Renaissance to the end of the twentieth century. The course covers the basic chronology of European history, including political, social, cultural, and economic developments, and addresses the relationships between European countries and between Europe and the rest of the world. The student will also develop writing skills in preparation for the AP exam.

AP Human Geography presents students with the curricular equivalent of an introductory college-level course in human geography or cultural geography. Content is presented thematically rather than regionally and is organized around the discipline’s main subfields: economic geography, cultural geography, political geography, and urban geography. The approach is spatial and problem oriented. Case studies are drawn from all world regions, with an emphasis on understanding the world in which we live today. Historical information serves to enrich analysis of the impacts of phenomena such as globalization, colonialism, and human-environment relationships on places, regions, cultural landscapes, and patterns of interaction.

This course is defined as a survey of American history from Columbus’ voyages to the present, including social, cultural, and economic developments, foreign relations, wars, and political events. The relationship between past and present events is emphasized. This course guides the student through a study of the social, cultural, political, and diplomatic history of the United States, as defined by the College Board’s Curriculum Outline (pp. 24-89) for the course. Analytical reading and writing skills are emphasized as students are prepared for the national AP exam in May.

World History is a year-long Ethos course that explores the key events and global historical developments starting with Mesopotamia and the first civilizations that have shaped the world we live in today all the way to modern day. The scope of Modern World History provides aspects across all of human experience: economics, science, religion, philosophy, politics & law, military conflict, literature & the arts. The course will create connections between our lives and those of our ancestors around the world. Students will uncover patterns of behavior, identify historical trends and themes, explore historical movements and concepts, and test theories. Students will refine their ability to read for comprehension and critical analysis; summarize, categorize, compare, and evaluate information; write clearly and convincingly; express facts and opinions orally; and use technology appropriately to present information.

Math

Algebra 1 is an introductory algebra course that stresses both the structure of algebra and the development of computational problem-solving skills. This course is designed to prepare students for success in geometry and to increase their understanding of algebraic concepts. Concepts include fundamentals of algebra, the language of algebra, solving equations, absolute values, graphing equations, relations and functions, linear equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and an introduction to statistics.

11th & 12th grade
Pre-reqs: Completion of an honors level Pre-Calculus course with a B average.
PSAT Math content test score of at least 29

A TI 83 or 84 calculator is required.

This course is designed to meet the specification of the College Board for a first year one-semester course in calculus. Students will learn to take limits, differentiate, integrate, solve extreme value problems, find areas under a curve, and find areas and volumes of revolution.

This course is designed to meet the specifications of the College Board for a first year two-quarter course in calculus. Students will learn to take limits, differentiate, integrate, solve extreme value problems, find areas under a curve, and find areas and volumes of revolution. All students who complete this course will take the AP Examination. Those who score well usually receive college credit, based on the AP policy of the student’s chosen college.

11th – 12th grade
Pre-reqs:
Completion of Algebra 2
PSAT/SAT Math content test score of at least 28.5
PSAT/SAT Critical Reading of at least 27
PSAT/SAT Writing score of at least 30

A TI 83 or 84 calculator is required.

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical influence.

Honors Geometry is a one-year in depth analytical study of Geometry. It is designed to stimulate deeper learning by creating and applying theorems about polygons, lines, angles, polyhedrons, and circles. Students are required to go beyond definitions and formulas to discover and prove why these theorems are true. Logical reasoning and proof is a major component of this class. This course also includes a review of many algebraic concepts as well as an introduction to trigonometry

Precalculus includes both a cumulative and rigorous study of functions which include: polynomials, exponentials, logarithmic, trigonometric, and piecewise. The topics of analytic geometry, sequences, series, summations, parametric equations, polar equations, limits, and derivatives are also covered in a cumulative and rigorous manner. This course is rigorous and designed to prepare students for the AP AB Calculus course.

During the first semester, most of the topics in this course extend concepts of single-variable calculus to functions with more than one independent variable. The course will cover the topics of polar and parametric equations, followed by a thorough study of vectors and the geometry of space and surfaces in space. Other topics include differentiation and integration of vector-valued functions, rates of change and extrema of functions of several variables, and multiple integration. During the second semester students will explore statistics in a deeper, calculus- based approach that will still prepare the student for the AP Statistics exam.

Science

This course investigates creation, through a scientific lens, investigating contemporary topics such as evolution, natural selection, genetics, and human behavior. Significant emphasis will be placed on molecular biology and biochemical reactions at the cellular level, applying them to myriad biological phenomena. The main areas of study are evolution, energy strategies, heritability, and communication. With a tremendous breadth and depth of material to cover, the pace is rigorous, and the student must devote himself or herself to a daily study of the material. Laboratory work is integrated into the course and is required of all students.

This course is the equivalent of a first-year college level general chemistry course. Students will attain an in-depth understanding of chemistry fundamentals mandated by the College Board. Students must employ critical thinking, independent study, and inquiry-based techniques to successfully navigate the curriculum. The areas of study in this curriculum include: stoichiometry; atomic structure and periodicity; chemical bonding; chemical reactions; states of matter; kinetics; equilibrium; acid-base chemistry and buffers; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. This class also will contain a several laboratory experiences consistent with the subject matter. For safety purposes, theses lab experiences will require access to a school chemistry lab and will be proctored by a qualified instructor. This course is recommended for students who wish to pursue science, engineering, or medical fields of study.

Computer science is a discipline with a core set of scientific principles that can be applied to solve complex, real-world problems and promote higher-order thinking. Computer science as an academic discipline provides the knowledge and skill foundation for technological advances in our country to keep us competitive in a global economy. In this course, students will study object-oriented programming using the Java language.

The AP CS course gives you a solid foundation for further study in the field. CS is a core element of STEM initiatives (science, technology, engineering, and math). Computer science encompasses many creative, exciting tracks of study in college. CS majors are heavily recruited because computing jobs are in the top 5 fastest growing fields in the U.S.

The curriculum focuses on the creative aspect of computing and computational thinking practices, enabling students to experience how computing impacts their everyday lives.An introduction to programming is included, but the class is much bigger in scope and will give students an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computing, the breadth of application and the potential for transforming the world in which we live. The AP-CSP class is designed to be a rigorous and engaging computing curriculum that appeals to a broad audience of students and educates them about the value of computing and encourages them to lead the world in information technology innovation.

AP Environmental Science is a course is that provides students with the scientific principles required to understand the interrelationships of the God’s magnificent creation, to identify and analyze environmental problems (both natural and human-made), to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. The course also addresses the role a Christian in environmental awareness and stewardship.

In order to prepare students for the content of the course, summer work is assigned that is due on the first day of school with an exam the first week covering the content of the summer assignment.

This course is an examination of macroeconomic theory and practice, emphasizing the study of U.S. government economic policy and the global economy. The course covers the seven essential themes of macroeconomics identified by the College Board as necessary preparation for the national AP exam in May. Drawing and interpreting graphs and diagrams are emphasized throughout the course. Advanced math skills are not required.

“For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.” Romans 1:20

Paul in his message to the Romans described God’s qualities being clearly understood.  The topics of physics shows us some of these things that are “clearly seen” in nature.  The invisible characteristics of our natural world points to the Creator.  Since we have natural laws to study, … there must be a natural law giver… God.

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based class equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. It will be taught with an inquiry-based approach.

AP Physics C is a fast-paced, rigorous, college-level course covering 2 semesters of a calculus-based physics class. First Semester is Mechanics, which provides instruction in each of the following content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Second Semester is Electricity and Magnetism, which provides instruction in each of the following content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. There are two separate AP Exams at the end of the second semester. The first is over Mechanics and the second covers Electricity and Magnetism.

Environmental Science equips students to discuss the spiritual, environmental, social, and economic aspects of today’s environmental issues. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. It will provide students with scientific principles to understand God’s vast creation and an understanding of the role a Christian has in environmental awareness and stewardship.

Earth Science is a standards-based inquiry class covering the introduction to the different branches of Earth Science. This course  will focus on the studies of Geology, Meteorology, Hydrology, and Astronomy.

The Human A&P course focuses on the structure and function of the human body from a systemic, cellular, and biochemical perspective. The students will learn fundamental anatomical and physiological terminology as well as explore how physiological function and anatomical structure are synchronously intertwined. As David states in Psalms 139: “For You created my inmost being; You knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise You because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; Your works are wonderful, I know that full well.”, an emphasis will be placed on the design, function and beauty of the human body and the exploration of how life is the product of intelligent design. The objective of this class is to meet the needs of students who have a potential interest in pursuing a medical related field as well as communicate practical knowledge of how organs and systems work together. Ethos offers dual credit through Colorado Christian University for this course.

Engineers solve some of the world’s biggest problems and have the potential to improve the quality of life for everyone on our planet through their ideas, designs, and inventions. In Principles of Engineering, students will explore the different types of engineering and gain exposure to the engineering design process from defining a problem to creating a viable solution to the problem. Throughout our course, students will learn skills to help them through the design process such as 2-D and 3-D modeling, how to operate under a given set of constraints such as budget and design limitations, static and dynamic design analysis, and leveraging technology to their advantage in the design process. Principles of Engineering will be an excellent way to expose students to the fundamentals of engineering or to deepen skills they already possess in these areas. Some lab fees will apply.

Life Science is the study of living organisms and life processes that occur in the natural world. The first semester covers content in the fields of ecology, cells and cell processes, and classification of life. The second semester covers content in the fields of genetics, natural selection and evolution, and human body systems.

Physical Science is the study of all matter in the universe: how it is made, how it behaves, and how it interacts. Through science we are able to see God’s work in creation and our daily lives. This course will include moments of discovery and exploration in the abundance of God’s creation and works.

Physical Science is a survey of both Chemistry and Physics. This course will investigate concepts through laboratory and field work using inquiry based learning and abstract concepts. First semester will focus on Chemistry concepts with Second semester wrapping up in Physics.

Physics is a unique course that allows students to explore many invisible aspects of creation including gravity, magnetism, sound, and the relationship between these forces. We explore the visible and invisible aspects of creation and order through a conceptually-based approach, including mathematical applications. The major topics covered during the course include: mechanics (the study of motion, Newton’s Laws of Motion, momentum, and energy); waves (both sound and light); electricity and magnetism; and modern physics. The course will also include a number of laboratory exercises as well as outside projects.

This one semester course is defined as a brief study of behavior and thought processes. The student will differentiate and discuss theories of personality, motivation, and psychological disorders. Leading figures in psychological research and therapy are examined. In addition, the student will recognize factors in a healthy self-image and social relationships with others.  This course will rely on case studies, interactive modules, research papers, and projects to express content mastery.

This course is also available for Summer 2021!

This course is defined as a brief scientific study of social structure and the patterns in which people interact in social relationships. The student will differentiate and discuss theories and methods of sociological inquiry. In addition, the student will analyze elements of social structure such as socialization, stratification and power, social location and intersectionality, social institutions, and social change through a sociological perspective. An interactive class setting – including discussion, field research, projects, and student presentations – will be utilized.

This course is also available for Summer 2021!

World Languages

In ASL 1, each student will become familiar with basic ASL vocabulary, finger-spelling, and ASL grammar to construct simple sentences and participate in basic interactions in ASL. Students will also participate in visual and receptive skill-building and will learn about Deaf culture.

The AP Chinese course is designed to prepare students for their successful performance on the AP exam. Students who score well usually earn college credit for Chinese courses at the college level, based on the AP policy of the student’s chosen college. Students will intensively practice spoken and written Chinese in the assigned activities in three aspects: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. Students are expected to be able to write about a variety of topics and engage in conversations to provide and obtain information, express feelings, exchange opinions, and make presentations. Due to the knowledge that “Chinese culture” makes up a significant part of the AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam, students will also learn important components of Chinese culture, including social practices and products.

The AP French course is designed to prepare students for successful performance on the AP exam. It will further develop language skills that were cultivated throughout French 2 through 4. An emphasis on literature will be used to sharpen reading and writing skills. Listening comprehension and speaking will be reinforced through daily practice. Advanced French grammar concepts will be refined through continued study and research.

The AP Spanish course is designed to prepare students for successful performance on the AP exam. It will further develop language skills that were cultivated throughout Honors Spanish 2 through 4. An emphasis on literature will be used to sharpen reading and writing skills. Listening comprehension and speaking will be reinforced through daily practice. Advanced Spanish grammar concepts will be refined through continued study and research.

Chinese 1 is an introduction to the Chinese language and culture. Students will study the Chinese pinyin system, radicals, Chinese numbers, characters, words, sentence patterns, and grammar that will enable them to begin to speak, read, understand, and typewrite the Chinese language. By the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) exchange basic greetings, (2) ask for someone’s name, (3) use basic kinship terms to name family members, (4) ask someone’s profession and name common professions, (5) talk about times and dates, ages, and birthdays, (6) ask about someone’s hobbies and name common hobbies, (7) make plans for the weekend, (8) introduce someone to another, and (9) briefly describe a visit to a friend’s house.  Students will also study Chinese history and culture and customs related to the lesson themes.

Chinese 2 is a continuation of concepts learned in Chinese 1. Students will expand the knowledge of Chinese characters, words, sentence patterns, and grammar that will enhance their skills in speaking, reading, understanding, and typewriting the Chinese language. At the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) talk to someone on a phone, (2) schedule an appointment with someone, (3) discuss someone’s exam performance and study habits, (4) describe a student’s daily activities, (5) exchange conversations with a salesperson while shopping for clothes, (6) discuss transportation, and (7) talk about weather. Students will also study Chinese history and culture and customs related to the lesson themes.

Chinese 3 is a continuation of concepts learned in Chinese 2. Students will expand the knowledge of Chinese characters, words, sentence patterns, and grammar that will enhance the skills in speaking, reading, understanding, and typewriting. At the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) talk about weather, (2) order food and talk to an attendant in a restaurant, (3) ask for and give directions, (4) plan to go to a party, (5) talk to a doctor, (6) plan for a date, (7) discuss about popular sports, and (8) talk about the travel plan.  In addition, students will study Chinese idioms, history, and culture and customs that are related to the lesson themes.

Chinese 4 is a continuation of concepts learned in Chinese 3. Students will expand their knowledge of Chinese characters, words, sentence patterns, and grammar that will enhance their skills in speaking, reading, understanding, and typewriting the Chinese language. At the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) state someone’s living space and discuss its pros and cons, (2) name four regional Chinese cuisines and order food and drinks in a Chinese restaurant, (3) discuss someone’s shopping preferences, (4) talk about making friends, (5) talk about the uses of computer and Internet, (6) state someone’s part-time working experience, (7) present opinions on children’s education, and (8) describe some features about China’s geography. In addition, they will study Chinese idioms, history, and culture and customs related to the lesson themes.

Chinese 5 is a continuation of concepts learned in Chinese 4. Students will expand their knowledge of Chinese characters, words, sentence patterns, and grammar that will enhance their skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing the Chinese language. At the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) state more features about major Chinese holidays, (2) state some changes of cities in China, (3) state more details about traveling In Mainland China, (4) describe some healthy habits, (5) discuss gender equality, (6) talk about environmental protection and energy sources, (7) describe common facts about Chinese history, and (8) discuss adjustments in a new country. In addition, they will study Chinese idioms, history, and culture and customs related to the lesson themes.

French 1 is an introduction to the French language and culture. Students will become familiar with vocabulary and grammar that will enable them to begin to read, write, speak, and understand the French language. Students will also develop an appreciation and respect for francophone culture and history.

French 2 is the continued exploration of French and Francophone language and culture. This course builds off of the building blocks of French 1 and works to improve fluency and reading abilities all while exploring and learning more about French and Francophone culture. We look forward to discovering the French language and people through innovative activities during and outside of class!

French 3 is a continuation of French 2, designed to solidify the skills necessary for effective communication. Concepts learned in French 1 and 2 will be expanded and practiced through class stories, readings and conversation. Topics include education, religion, storytelling, and French culture and literature. French 3 emphasizes practicing more complex interpersonal communication in the present, past, and future; developing proficiency in reading selected excerpts, short stories and novellas; and exploring French and francophone history, art, cuisine, film, and music.

French 4 is a study of French language, culture and literature designed to develop fluency in the skills necessary for mastery of the French language: Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Listening. Concepts learned in French 1-3 will be expanded and practiced as students work toward more fluency of speech and mastery of written French. Students will focus on more varied interpersonal communication, developing increased proficiency in reading and analyzing French texts, completing longer written pieces in a variety of modes, and investigating and responding to the varied expressions of French and francophone culture.

In Greek 1, students will begin to acquire communication skills in Biblical Greek as well as strengthening their reading comprehension, writing, and vocabulary skills. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students will learn not only about the language of Jesus’ time period, but also the culture behind the texts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read selected verses and texts from the New Testament in its original language. Beyond an introductory knowledge of Greek, students will have an appreciation for the New Testament and the cultural context in which it was written.

Note: We will add a course each year, starting with Greek 1. Our plan is to add Greek 2 next year, culminating with AP Greek in future years.

Hebrew 1 is an introductory course to Biblical Hebrew as used in the Old Testament. In Hebrew 1, students will acquire the necessary skills to begin to read Hebrew in their own Hebrew Bibles. The course is designed to give an introductory look at the vocabulary, reading comprehension, writing, and cultural knowledge needed to read the Hebrew Scriptures on their own. By the end of the course, students will be able to read selected verses and texts from the Old Testament in their original language. Beyond an introductory knowledge of Hebrew, students will have an appreciation for the Old Testament and the cultural context in which it was written.

Note: We will add a course each year, starting with Hebrew 1. Our plan is to add Hebrew 2 next year, culminating with AP Hebrew in future years.

In Latin 1, students begin acquiring reading skills in Latin as well as strengthening their English reading and vocabulary skills through vocabulary building and analyzing sentence structure. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students learn about the daily lives of the Romans and make comparisons relevant to today’s society. Students will use Latin orally to initiate and respond to simple statements and commands as well as read Latin aloud. Elementary writing tasks also build a bridge to understanding the written word.

In Latin 2, students refine reading skills in Latin as well as continue to strengthen their English reading and vocabulary skills through vocabulary building and analyzing sentence structure. Students are introduced to more complex syntactical and grammatical structures. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students acquire a more in-depth knowledge about the daily lives and history of the Romans and continue to make comparisons relevant to today’s society. Students will use Latin orally to initiate and respond to more complex statements and commands as well as read Latin aloud. Intermediate writing tasks also build a bridge to understanding the written word.

In Latin 3, students begin to transition toward reading authentic Latin prose. Students are introduced to high-level syntactical and grammatical structures. They will further strengthen their English reading and vocabulary skills through vocabulary building and analyzing sentence structure. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students learn about the literary and stylistic devices appropriate for prose. Concentration is also focused on the philosophic, historic, and cultural aspects relevant to these selections. Students will develop a sense of meaningful phrase grouping with appropriate voice inflection and fluency when reading, and will begin to use Latin orally to hold short conversations. Students will begin to compose complex written sentences and/or short dialogues in Latin. Ethos offers dual credit through Colorado Christian University. CCU issues a 3 hour credit for this Ethos course.

Spanish 1 is an introduction to the Spanish language and culture. The student will be able to engage in basic communication including themes such as school, family, hobbies, and activities using the present tense. The student will also be exposed to introductory Hispanic culture.

Spanish 2 is a continuation of concepts learned in Spanish 1. Student’s communication will expand to include past tenses and themes such as daily routine, shopping, gastronomy, health, and celebrations. Students will expand their knowledge of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and conversational skills. Emphasis will be placed on conversation, listening, and reading skills at an accelerated level.

This course is designed as a continuation of the concepts learned in Spanish 1 and 2. Vocabulary themes will include technology, the home, and nature using the present and past tenses, and an introduction to the subjunctive. This course also includes the study of literature, history, and culture of Hispanic countries. The student will expand his/her knowledge of grammar and vocabulary at an accelerated rate. Emphasis will be placed on conversation, listening and reading skills.

Students will have opportunities throughout both semesters to earn Honors Quality Points by completing additional requirements as determined by the team of World Languages teachers. Exams will be required both semesters to earn honors credit. Honors credit can be earned in either semester, or in both. Please refer to the High School Academic Policies section at the beginning of this document for policy information regarding honors credit.